Doris Kearns Goodwin

Apr 2, 2005

Pulitzer Prize-winning author and presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin shares her perspectives on baseball, a professional challenge and Abraham Lincoln with Meridee Duddleston. Goodwin appeared at the Philadelphia Speakers Series.

Pet Therapy

Mar 26, 2005

Members of the Deer Meadows Retirement Home community highlight the benefits of adding small animals to a living environment. Temple's John Shank, Ed.D., CTRS, chair of the Department of Therapeutic Recreation adds his views.

Type 2 Diabetes

Mar 19, 2005

In the last fifteen years overweight, obesity and type 2 diabetes have taken a parallel course upward. Meridee Duddleston talks with three physicians looking into this chronic disease.

Blogs

Mar 12, 2005

A new blog is being created every three seconds. Meridee Duddleston peeks into the world of web logs.

Dave Barry

Mar 5, 2005

WRTI News Director Windsor Johnston had the opportunity to speak with Dave Barry, acclaimed humorist and journalist whose column appears in over 500 newspapers in the United States. Barry is the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary, and is the author of best-seller Dave Barry Talks Back. Dave Barry was part of the Philadelphia Speaker Series.

Celebration of Black History Month

Feb 26, 2005

Part of WRTI's celebration of Black History month, Meridee Duddleston facilitates a glimpse of the ties between a jazz musician, a lyric structure, a playwright, and a poet.

Salvador Dali Exhibit Curator Michael Taylor

Feb 19, 2005

Meridee Duddleston speaks with Michael Taylor about the Dali retrospective on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art until May 15th.

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak part 3

Feb 12, 2005

WRTI News Director Windsor Johnston had the opportunity to speak with former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak.

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak part 2

Feb 12, 2005

WRTI News Director Windsor Johnston had the opportunity to speak with former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak.

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak part 1

Feb 12, 2005

WRTI News Director Windsor Johnston had the opportunity to speak with former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak.

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Wikipedia Commons

In the early 20th century, Leopold Stokowski was transforming The Philadelphia Orchestra into a major force in classical music, while roughly 6 ½ miles away in the nearby suburbs, Albert Barnes was amassing his now world-famous art collection.

While a classical concerto most commonly features one soloist, Béla Bartók’s concerto for orchestra highlights many sections of the ensemble. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it became one of Bartók’s most popular works.

It’s rare that avant-garde music gets time in the spotlight these days. WRTI’s Maureen Malloy gives you some history on the free jazz movement, and a glimpse into its future. Check out the October Revolution of Jazz and Contemporary Music organized by Ars Nova Workshop and Fringe Arts, from October 4th to 7th.

Johannes Plennio/Unsplash

It was the summer of 1934. At his villa in Switzerland near Lake Lucerne, Sergei Rachmaninoff wrote his Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 comprised of 24 variations. The Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Leopold Stokowski, premiered the work in November, 1934 with Rachmaninoff himself as soloist in Baltimore. It was an immediate success.

Skillful young athletes might get their career bearings on a pro team, but what’s the equivalent for promising artists in the classical music world? One organization has mentored some of the best in the field, including guitarist Jason Vieaux, pianist Simone Dinnerstein, flutist Mimi Stillman, soprano Angela Meade, and the string trio Time For Three.

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