Meridee Duddleston

News Reporter, Arts Desk Reporter

Meridee began reporting in the newsroom at WRTI in 2003 while working toward a master's degree in journalism at Temple University.  Since that time, her duties have expanded to morning news anchor and contributor of weekly Arts Desk features.

A graduate of Mitchell Hamline School of Law, Meridee grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and practiced law before making a major leap into the world of journalism. She also holds a graduate degree from New York University School of Law and received a B.A in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

In 2011, Meridee was recognized for outstanding public affairs reporting by the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcaster's Association (PAPBA) with awards for two News & Views stories. She received 1st place for "Baby Boomers Becoming Seniors: A Growing Population in Philadelphia," and 2nd place for "TUNE UP PHILLY: Classical Music Instruction as a Vehicle for Social Change."

Meridee can be heard weekday mornings between 6 and 10 am.

Ways to Connect

Henry Grossman; Courtesy of Bernice Horowitz

When Leonard Bernstein’s baton broke during a rehearsal of Candide in the early 1970s, who was summoned to repair it? Richard Horowitz, who at the time was principal timpanist of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra.

Gift of Henny Durmashkin Gurko, Museum of Jewish Heritage, NY

A 29-year-old Leonard Bernstein stands next to Holocaust survivors—members of the Ex-Concentration Camp Orchestra. They’re at a displaced persons camp in Germany in May 1948, four years after their liberation from the Nazi death camps. 

Richard Horowitz’s customer list read like a who’s who: Zubin Mehta, Sir Colin Davis, Seiji Ozawa, Sarah Caldwell, James Levine, Sir Charles Mackerras, Klaus Tennstedt, Daniel Barenboim, and Leonard Bernstein.  He was a percussionist, who, quite by accident, came to craft batons for some of the most famous conductors of the world.

When it comes to batons, one size does NOT fit all. Length, material, and handle are all a matter of individual preference.  Want to know what the professionals look for?  Here are ten facts about the tool that quickly fades into the musical landscape shaped by the person commanding it.

Dayne Topkin/Unsplash

A group of high school girls are spending two weeks this July on the Temple University campus, immersing themselves in the world of music composition. They're taking classes in music theory, ear training, and composition of orchestral scores and songs, using electronic as well as acoustic music.

Amato Photography


Classical guitarist Michael Poll has been engaged in a labor of love with J.S. Bach’s music for over two years. His new album 7-String Bach is the culmination of his “Bach Project,” launched through a highly successful Kickstarter campaign.

Lars Borges

When Britain’s Prince Harry and American Meghan Markle took their wedding vows on May 19th, a 19-year-old cellist added to the musical pageantry of the royal ceremony.  Sheku Kanneh-Mason caught the attention of Prince Harry last June while playing at a charity event in London.  Now he’s graduating to a worldwide stage.   

We have film director Stanley Kubrick to thank for creating a 1968 sci-fi film imprinting music and images onto our collective consciousness. Now, 50 years after his movie changed the course of sci-fi films, Warner Brothers is re-releasing Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey.

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