Meridee Duddleston

News Reporter, Arts Desk Reporter

Meridee began reporting in the newsroom at WRTI in 2003 while working toward a master's degree in journalism at Temple University.  Since that time, her duties have expanded to morning news anchor and contributor of weekly Arts Desk features.

A graduate of Mitchell Hamline School of Law, Meridee grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota, and practiced law before making a major leap into the world of journalism. She also holds a graduate degree from New York University School of Law and received a B.A in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

In 2011, Meridee was recognized for outstanding public affairs reporting by the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcaster's Association (PAPBA) with awards for two News & Views stories. She received 1st place for "Baby Boomers Becoming Seniors: A Growing Population in Philadelphia," and 2nd place for "TUNE UP PHILLY: Classical Music Instruction as a Vehicle for Social Change."

Meridee can be heard weekday mornings between 6 and 10 am.

Ways to Connect

Known especially for his New World Symphony and Slavonic Dances, Czech composer Antonín Dvořák wrote a song about motherhood for piano and voice that has become a standard for opera singers around the world.

Susanna-Drescher

Hailed as “radiant” by The New York Times and “ethereal" by Newsweek Polska, the award-winning early music ensemble Peregrina, from Basel, Switzerland, will perform on WRTI in advance of upcoming concerts with Piffaro, the Renaissance Band. 

Earth Day is celebrated annually on April 22nd with events that bring people together to raise awareness for environmental protection. This year, take some personal time to appreciate the world we live in. Breathe in, breathe out, and find peace and tranquility listening to these five classical gems inspired by the secrets, the majesty, and the boldness of the earth.

Sound Evidence

Philadelphia's Jamaaladeen Tacuma has been pushing the boundaries of the electric bass for over four decades, and always commands attention with his unique sound and style. His mastery of the instrument and commitment to the jazz community has inspired the City of Philadelphia to present him with this year’s Benny Golson Award, named for the great sax player.

It's too cold! It’s too hot! It’s really kind of feverish. Listen to a jazz riot of emotions. Here are 10 spring standouts curated by Jazz Director Maureen Malloy. Each, in no special order, has inspired hundreds of interpretations.

Al Ravenna, courtesy of The Library of Congress

What did “faith” mean to Leonard Bernstein? Although to many his name is synonymous with music, he described his life’s work as a search for a solution to the 20th-century crisis of faith. 

Benjamin Ealovega

Music for Food is a national effort to fight hunger at the local level, through funds raised at classical music concerts. Pianist Jonathan Biss has spearheaded the inaugural year of the Philadelphia chapter of Music for Food with help from Curtis Institute of Music faculty and students.

Photo Credit Nic D'Amico

Swan Lake was Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's first foray into classical ballet, with a debut in 1877. Today if you ask someone to name an iconic ballet, Swan Lake is one that usually comes to mind. Believe it or not, that probably would have surprised the composer. 

Are you a basic romantic, a starry-eyed sweetheart, a cranky curmudgeon, or a wizened veteran of love's enduring themes? Let’s hear from you! What concerto, song, movement, or jazz riff pulls on your heartstrings On Wednesday, February 14th we’re devoting our regular jazz and classical request hours to YOUR Valentine’s Day favorites. Tell us what they are! 

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