Susan Lewis

Arts & Culture Reporter

Susan is an arts and culture reporter for WRTI. She contributes Arts Desk features, and weekly intermission interviews for The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast series on WRTI with host Gregg Whiteside.

She is also a freelance essayist, journalist, and speechwriter who has written about Philadelphia for Insight Guides and Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation's Culture Files.  A former columnist for Philadelphia Magazine, she is the author of Reinventing Ourselves after Motherhood and a book of essays. Her work has appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer, Child Magazine, Parents Magazine, Reader's Digest and Ladies' Home Journal (Parents Digest).

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Susan is also a lawyer, with a B.A. in Philosophy from Trinity College, Connecticut, and a J.D. from New York University School of Law. She has practiced law in New York City and taught entertainment law at Rutgers Law School in Camden.

Ways to Connect

Chris Lee/Philadelphia Orchestra

Join host Gregg Whiteside in October on Sundays at 1 pm, and Mondays at 7 pm on HD-2, as our Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcasts, conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, take you to Saratoga Springs to hear highlights of four concerts from August—recorded live at the town's outdoor amphitheater nestled into a hillside on the grounds of Saratoga Spa State Park.

Wikipedia Commons

In the early 20th century, Leopold Stokowski was transforming The Philadelphia Orchestra into a major force in classical music, while roughly 6 ½ miles away in the nearby suburbs, Albert Barnes was amassing his now world-famous art collection.

David Ludwig, described by The Philadelphia Inquirer as "a composer with something urgent to say," has a new monodrama set to a text by poet Katie Ford, exploring a medieval spiritual practice called "Anchorism." Join us for highlights from The Anchoress a day before its world premiere. WRTI's Susan Lewis hosts the composer, poet, soprano Hyunah Yu, Piffaro, The Renaissance Band, and PRISM Quartet in the WRTI Performance Studio on Tuesday, October 16 at 12:10 PM.

Among his accolades, pianist Jeffrey Siegel has been praised by The Washington Post for his "pianistic eloquence with a special gift for commentary." Host of Keyboard Conversations, the touring series of concerts with commentary, Siegel plays and talks about Leonard Bernstein and his music with WRTI’s Kevin Gordon in advance of his appearance at the Kimmel Center. 

While a classical concerto most commonly features one soloist, Béla Bartók’s concerto for orchestra highlights many sections of the ensemble. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it became one of Bartók’s most popular works.

In its new CD, Grammy-winning choir The Crossing sings Lansing McLoskey's oratorio, Zealot Canticles. WRTI's Susan Lewis talks with The Crossing's conductor Donald Nally about the poetry, choral writing, and social issues that converge in this work.

A melody in Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Second Symphony was made famous to fans of Eric Carmen’s pop tune “Never Gonna Fall in Love Again.” But in the symphony, that melody leads to one of the most beautiful, and difficult, clarinet solos in the literature. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has the story.

Peter Ralston

If you think of Andrew Wyeth primarily as a realist landscape painter who bucked the trends of the mid 20th-century art world, get ready to meet the artist anew.  The documentary film WYETH sheds new light on his life and art, through conversations with the people he knew as family, neighbors and subjects, and archival interviews with the artist himself. 

By Office of Emergency Management [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

America was celebrating its bicentennial when Michael Tilson Thomas first became intrigued by a Carl Sandburg poem. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, nearly 40 years later,  he premiered his musical setting of  Four Preludes on Playthings of the Wind with a cautionary message still relevant today.


Jordan August/Mann Center for the Performing Arts

It's football season! We're excited to watch the plays on the field from the snaps to the passes to the touchdowns. Football also means music. WRTI's Susan Lewis went to NFL Films in Mount Laurel, NJ to get the scoop about how football films use the rich sound of orchestral music to help tell their stories.

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