The Barnes Foundation

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In the early 20th century, Leopold Stokowski was transforming The Philadelphia Orchestra into a major force in classical music, while roughly 6 ½ miles away in the nearby suburbs, Albert Barnes was amassing his now world-famous art collection.

Dr. Albert Barnes was often keen to mix music with his legendary art collection. So in that spirit, the Barnes Foundation will be adding some 16 concerts to Philadelphia’s classical music community. The Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns reports they will be serious.

A two-decade survey of works by Jamaican-born, Harlem-based artist Nari Ward includes found objects, and expresses the complexity of cultural identity. Sun Splashed is now at The Barnes Foundation through August 22nd.


In fall 2015, the Barnes Foundation announced that more than one million visitors had passed through its doors on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. But the enriching impact of art isn’t necessarily confined to a single space. WRTI’s Meridee Duddleston speaks with recently appointed Chief Curator Sylvie Patry to find out how the incomparable collection hopes to expand its rooted reach.

The Barnes Foundation

One of the unusual aspects of the Barnes Foundation is its wrought iron collection – shoe buckles, hinges, latches, and other objects integrated throughout the galleries. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on Albert Barnes’ fascination with, and approach to, metal works - now the subject of two special exhibitions.


Opera Philadelphia is celebrating its 40th birthday by announcing the boldest change of its history. The company has just unveiled the creation of an annual season-opening opera festival - Festival O - premiering in September of 2017 with O17. It's modeled after two highly successful American festivals - Sundance in Park City, Utah and Spoleto in Charleston, SC. The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns reports.

Chances are that you're familiar with the names of some of the most popular French Impressionists - Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edouard Manet, Camille Pissarro, Edgar Degas - and some of their most iconic paintings. And chances are that you've never heard of the man who devoted his career to generating a market and public acceptance of their works.  WRTI's Meridee Duddleston has the story.

Rick Echelmeyer, photographer / The Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia displays its art exactly the way it was shown in Albert C. Barnes’ mansion in Merion. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, three visual artists respond to the idiosyncratic ensembles of Impressionist masters, African art, metalwork, furniture, and more.

Music intersects with visual art in a new string quartet. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the work is a musical reaction to the unconventional way that paintings, furniture, metalwork and other objects are displayed at the Barnes Foundation.

Radio script:

Music: Carrot Revolution

Susan Lewis: The beginning of the string quartet called Carrot Revolution is quite percussive - with sounds you don’t think of as coming from violins, viola, and cello.

    

Among those who have shaped Philadelphia’s cultural landscape is someone who not only created his own art, but also influenced the development of the now-renowned Barnes collection in the early 20th century. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on realist painter and Barnes confidant William Glackens (1870-1938).