Gil Shaham

As we approach the anniversary of what would be his 100th birthday on August 25th, we're celebrating Leonard Bernstein. Some classical stars of today share their thoughts below on Bernstein's extraordinary influence on their lives and the music world.


Tchaikovsky wrote his violin concerto in 1878, but his friends and family were critical and he didn’t find a violinist to premiere it for over three years. Now, as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the concerto is one of the most frequently performed concertos in the repertoire.

Twentieth-century Austrian composer Alban Berg dedicated his Violin Concerto to the memory of the 18-year-old daughter of a friend. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the work evokes emotion not typically associated with the 12-tone style.


Join us on Sunday from 1 to 3 pm for The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert. This week, you'll hear a re-broadcast of a performance of Bela Bartok’s Violin Concerto No. 2, infused with the dance rhythms of Hungarian folklore, and played by the multi award-winning violinist Gil Shaham.


Hulton archive

After publicly resisting the growing fascism in Europe in the 1930s, Hungarian pianist and composer Bela Bartok eventually fled his homeland. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, he wrote his Violin Concerto No. 2 not long before emigrating to the United States.


J.S. Bach was born more than three centuries ago, yet contemporary musicians continue to mine riches from his music. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, award-winning violinist Gil Shaham finds Bach connections in everything he plays.

The Strad: Great Or Just Very Good?

Sep 1, 2014

Nearly 300 years after the death of Antonio Stadivarius, the classical music world is paying up more and more millions for his violins.  And audiences attend concerts advertised more for their instruments than those playing them.

The Philadelphia Inquirer's David Patrick Stearns asks: should fiddles be calling the tunes?

Join us this Sunday at 2 pm for a very special treat. It's the Philadelphia Orchestra's May 24th LIVE broadcast of a concert tribute to the Orchestra’s former Music Director Wolfgang Sawallisch. This was the first live Philadelphia Orchestra broadcast in 13 years, and a memorable event it was, featuring a performance by violinist Gil Shaham of the Brahms Violin Concerto. Yannick Nézet-Séguin is on the podium.

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