Belle Sandella

The Metropolitan Opera on WRTI 90.1: The Complete Schedule Is Here

What's the best way to listen to the Saturday matinee broadcasts of The Metropolitan Opera? On WRTI 90.1, of course! Join us on Saturdays at 1 PM for the entire 2019/2020 season of opera broadcasts.

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Jeff Fusco/The Philadelphia Orchestra

Join us on Sunday, March 1st at 1 PM to hear Yannick Nézét-Séguin conduct the first Philadelphia Orchestra subscription concert at the Academy of Music in nearly 20 years.  The Orchestra’s 2019-2020 themes of BeethovenNOW and WomenNOW are front and center, as the Philadelphians perform a work by Vivian Fung for the first time, and Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 with soloist Yefim Bronfman.

February 24, 2020. As WRTI continues to mark Black History Month, we feature an album that celebrates, through contemporary music, the writings of the 19th-century Philadelphia abolitionist William Still

Charles Boudreau

Described by NPR as “one of today’s most eclectic composers,” Vivian Fung’s inspirations range from ancient gamelon music to ideas for preparing pot roast (for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, no less!)

February 24, 2020. Late in 2018, trumpeter Joe Magnarelli released his latest record, If You Could See Me Now. Curious title—might Magnarelli have been slyly foreshadowing his forthcoming appearance on WRTI’s VuHaus series? Anything’s possible. Though it’s much more plausible that the album takes its name from the iconic tune Tadd Dameron composed for Sarah Vaughan in 1946.

Rob Davidson Media

Join us on Friday, February 21st at 12:10 PM when Flutist Robert Cart and pianist Regina DiMedio Marrazza preview selections from their upcoming performance presented by the Philadelphia Ethical Society as part of its "Music for Good" concert series. Composer Eric Sessler joins the duo and WRTI's Susan Lewis hosts.

Dario Acosta

We have ourselves a very unique Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on Sunday, February 23rd at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1, and Monday, February 24th at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2. Join us for an all-American concert broadcast that features two Pulitzer Prize-winning compositions, a vibrant orchestral suite drawn from a contemporary opera, and a performance by pianist Garrick Ohlsson.

Members of Piffaro, The Renaissance Band are joined by musicians from the Newberry Consort—an ensemble called "Chicago's gift to early music" by the Boston Globe—in the WRTI Performance Studio to preview music from their upcoming joint concert honoring Isabelle d'Este, a prominent influencer of the Italian Renaissance. WRTI's Susan Lewis is host.

This Is What You Should Know About Handel's Water Music

Feb 17, 2020
Wikipedia Commons

George Frideric Handel was born in Germany in 1685, and moved to Britain as a young man. He spent his most productive years there, and became a naturalized British subject in his early 40s. His now-famous Water Music suites, commissioned for King George I for a ceremonial boat ride on the River Thames in London, were first performed during the summer of 1717.

February 17, 2020. Acclaimed by The Guardian as "one of the world's leading bel canto stars," tenor Lawrence Brownlee brings his extraordinary power, range and depth of expression to the great tradition of spirituals in our album of the week, Spiritual Sketches

February 17, 2020. At just 37 minutes, and comprising eight takes of only five distinct tunes, it’s hard to categorize John Coltrane’s Blue World as an album, per se.

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The Met Opera on WRTI

Saturday at 1 PM

WRTI Arts Desk

February 24, 2020. As WRTI continues to mark Black History Month, we feature an album that celebrates, through contemporary music, the writings of the 19th-century Philadelphia abolitionist William Still

Charles Boudreau

Described by NPR as “one of today’s most eclectic composers,” Vivian Fung’s inspirations range from ancient gamelon music to ideas for preparing pot roast (for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, no less!)

February 24, 2020. Late in 2018, trumpeter Joe Magnarelli released his latest record, If You Could See Me Now. Curious title—might Magnarelli have been slyly foreshadowing his forthcoming appearance on WRTI’s VuHaus series? Anything’s possible. Though it’s much more plausible that the album takes its name from the iconic tune Tadd Dameron composed for Sarah Vaughan in 1946.

Rob Davidson Media

Join us on Friday, February 21st at 12:10 PM when Flutist Robert Cart and pianist Regina DiMedio Marrazza preview selections from their upcoming performance presented by the Philadelphia Ethical Society as part of its "Music for Good" concert series. Composer Eric Sessler joins the duo and WRTI's Susan Lewis hosts.

This Is What You Should Know About Handel's Water Music

Feb 17, 2020
Wikipedia Commons

George Frideric Handel was born in Germany in 1685, and moved to Britain as a young man. He spent his most productive years there, and became a naturalized British subject in his early 40s. His now-famous Water Music suites, commissioned for King George I for a ceremonial boat ride on the River Thames in London, were first performed during the summer of 1717.

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