WRTI's Jim Hilgen takes a look at sleep patterns.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

WRTI's Jim Hilgen takes a look at sleep patterns.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

Intelligent Design advocates claim that the natural world is so complex that there must have been some design, rather than random selection, involved. WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at this controversial subject.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

Intelligent Design advocates claim that the natural world is so complex that there must have been some design, rather than random selection, involved. WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at this controversial subject.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

Intelligent Design advocates claim that the natural world is so complex that there must have been some design, rather than random selection, involved. WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at this controversial subject.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

WRTI's Jim Hilgen takes a look at the global danger of tuberculosis, a largely forgotten disease.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

WRTI's Jim Hilgen takes a look at the global danger of tuberculosis, a largely forgotten disease.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

WRTI's Jim Hilgen takes a look at the global danger of tuberculosis, a largely forgotten disease.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

An estimated ten thousand children will face a diagnosis of cancer this year. WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at childhood cancers on this Temple View.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

An estimated ten thousand children will face a diagnosis of cancer this year. WRTI's Jim Hilgen looks at childhood cancers on this Temple View.

Temple View is WRTI's daily public affairs program featuring short interviews with newsmakers, authors, musicians, and, of course, experts on various topics--many featuring Temple University faculty members.

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Wikipedia Commons

In the early 20th century, Leopold Stokowski was transforming The Philadelphia Orchestra into a major force in classical music, while roughly 6 ½ miles away in the nearby suburbs, Albert Barnes was amassing his now world-famous art collection.

While a classical concerto most commonly features one soloist, Béla Bartók’s concerto for orchestra highlights many sections of the ensemble. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it became one of Bartók’s most popular works.

It’s rare that avant-garde music gets time in the spotlight these days. WRTI’s Maureen Malloy gives you some history on the free jazz movement, and a glimpse into its future. Check out the October Revolution of Jazz and Contemporary Music organized by Ars Nova Workshop and Fringe Arts, from October 4th to 7th.

Johannes Plennio/Unsplash

It was the summer of 1934. At his villa in Switzerland near Lake Lucerne, Sergei Rachmaninoff wrote his Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 comprised of 24 variations. The Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Leopold Stokowski, premiered the work in November, 1934 with Rachmaninoff himself as soloist in Baltimore. It was an immediate success.

Skillful young athletes might get their career bearings on a pro team, but what’s the equivalent for promising artists in the classical music world? One organization has mentored some of the best in the field, including guitarist Jason Vieaux, pianist Simone Dinnerstein, flutist Mimi Stillman, soprano Angela Meade, and the string trio Time For Three.

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