Sunday Jazz Brunch with Bob Perkins

Sunday, 9:00 am To 1:00 pm

"B.P. with the G.M." (Bob Perkins with the Good Music) brings his swinging weeknight approach to Sunday brunch time. Four hours of genuine jazz will put a smile on your face and make you a regular listener.

During a recent interview, saxophone great Larry Mckenna was right on target when he shared that often in other cities, when people found out he was from Philadelphia, they’d ask him if he knew fellow Philadelphia  saxophone great Bootsie Barnes. 

Bootsie Barnes, a tenor saxophonist and bandleader who set a rigorous standard for hard bop, presiding as a master and mentor in his hometown of Philadelphia, died on Wednesday at Lankenau Medical Center in Wynnewood, Pa. He was 82.

When a dynamic figure in any walk of life departs, writers and just plain folks, usually try to recall certain events about the departed in which they may have been involved, or heard about.

February 24, 2020. Late in 2018, trumpeter Joe Magnarelli released his latest record, If You Could See Me Now. Curious title—might Magnarelli have been slyly foreshadowing his forthcoming appearance on WRTI’s NPR Live Sessions series? Anything’s possible. Though it’s much more plausible that the album takes its name from the iconic tune Tadd Dameron composed for Sarah Vaughan in 1946.

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When I was a kid growing up in South Philly, there was an older fellow down the block who was trying to play an alto saxophone. He wasn't doing well at it.

If you're looking for BP with the GM, never fear, Bob Perkins is still here! He's back on the radio starting on January 2nd, 2020 at 6 PM.

September 23, 2019. Imagine Sting playing just one more sold-out gig with Stewart Copeland and Andy Summers as The Police. Or maybe Alexander Hamilton and George Washington getting together to teach the new country they built how to say goodbye, just "one last time."

"I don't believe America was founded to be one dimensional," pianist Cyrus Chestnut asserts. "It's various different people coming together, quote unquote, to develop something hip."

April is Jazz Appreciation Month, and WRTI is celebrating throughout the month with music that showcases one of the most magical and innovative years of jazz—1959, which was 60 years ago.

Winold Reiss/Wikpedia Commons

Langston Hughes, an enduring icon of the Harlem Renaissance, is best-known for his written work, which wedded his fierce dedication to social justice with his belief in the transformative power of the word. But he was a music lover, too, and some of the works he was most proud of were collaborations with composers and musicians.

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