Beethoven

Jeff Fusco/The Philadelphia Orchestra

It was only this past January (which seems so long ago) that the Philadelphians performed Vivian Fung’s Dust Devils for the first time, coinciding with the Orchestra’s return to the Academy of Music for its first subscription concert there in nearly 20 years. We're re-broadcasting that concert, conducted by Yannick Nézét-Séguin, on Sunday, October 18th at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1 and Monday, October 19th at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2.

Mathias Bothor

On Sunday, October 11th at 1 pm on WRTI 90.1 and Monday, October 12th at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2, one of the most beloved musicians of our time, pianist Emanuel Ax—who made his Philadelphia Orchestra debut in 1975—performs Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a broadcast from a February 2020 concert at Verizon Hall.

August 3, 2020. This is is Beethoven’s 250th anniversary birth year. It’s also the year the coronavirus pandemic has forced the cancellation of countless live concert tributes to Beethoven across the globe. This calamitous turn of events makes the release of important Beethoven recordings especially welcome.

Dario Acosta

The 2019-2020 Philadelphia Orchestra season was built around two themes – BeethovenNow (in this 250th anniversary year of his birth), and WomenNOW. And our Sunday, July 19th re-broadcast at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1 and repeated on Monday, July 20th at 7 PM on HD-2 begins and ends with compositions by French women of the 19th and early-20th centuries, with Beethoven right in the middle.

On this Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on Thursday, June 4th at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2 and Friday, June 5th at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1, guest conductor Fabio Luisi is on the podium, and the brilliant young French pianist Lise de la Salle, with whom Maestro Luisi has often collaborated, is the soloist in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4.

Maurice Jerry Beznos

Pianist Emanual Ax, known both for both his virtuosity and genuine good nature, is drawn to the power and genius of Beethoven. You wouldn't know, just from talking to him, that he's one of today's great pianists.

Carliss Million

The Philadelphia Orchestra has canceled performances of Beethoven’s Fifth and Sixth Symphonies scheduled for March 12th, 14th and 15th as a safety measure due to the coronavirus outbreak. But there's good news: Thanks to the unique partnership between WRTI and the Orchestra, the music will still be heard by thousands of listeners throughout our region and the world.

December 16, 2019. This week, we're celebrating Beethoven’s birthday! Although the big birthday, the 250th comes next year, we’re celebrating nonetheless, because 249 is nothing to sneeze at.

Julia Wesely

In the midst of an East Coast U.S. tour, alumni and student wind and string players from The Curtis Institute of Music visited WRTI's Performance Studio to play music by Penderecki and Beethoven and chat with WRTI's Susan Lewis.

Simon Fowler

Beethoven had a funny side, and conductor Nathalie Stutzmann says you can hear it in his Symphony No.4, a work that's often been overshadowed by his grander symphonic compositions. WRTI's Susan Lewis has the story.

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