Debra Lew Harder

Steve J. Sherman

Join us on Sunday, July 21 at 1 PM as Yannick Nézet-Séguin, in a concert from 2018, conducts a program featuring a world premiere of a work by Nico Muhly, one of the most popular of all piano concertos,—Grieg’s A Minor—and the work Rachmaninoff composed with the Philadelphia Sound in mind, the Symphonic Dances. André Watts is soloist.

Listen to this live broadcast from the WRTI performance studio! Our guests include clarinetist Mark Dover, violinists Siwoo Kim and Brendan Speltz, violist William Frampton, and cellist Andrew Yee playing the blues, along with the music of Johannes Brahms. WRTI’s Debra Lew Harder hosts.

Benjamin Ealovega


Robert Schumann’s Piano Concerto in A minor is one of my all-time favorite pieces. It’s passionate, lyrical, intimate, and joyous. The opening melody alone, which Robert based on his wife Clara’s name, is “from another world,” as André Watts once said.

Join us every Sunday throughout the month of May from 4 to 6 PM to hear the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra in four concerts recorded live at the Kimmel Center’s Verizon Hall. You’ll hear some of the most talented young musicians in our region, playing with exceptional soloists, and conducted by PYO Music Director Louis Scaglione. Listen at WRTI 90.1, streaming at WRTI.org, and on the WRTI App.

Why are we drawn to a good tune? Find out as WRTI Classical Host Debra Lew Harder sits down at the piano in the WRTI Performance Studio and plays selections from her new concert and conversation program, The Human Need for Melody, and chats with WRTI’s Susan Lewis.


Wikipedia Commons

While Easter has inspired Bach's Saint Matthew Passion and many other beloved classical works, the holiday of Passover—being celebrated by millions of the Jewish faith this week—claims no famous pieces in the concert repertoire. WRTI's Debra Lew Harder explores why, and finds out what music you can find at a seder.

Listen to Grammy-nominated composer Curt Cacioppo perform at the piano with Italian violinist Francesco D’Orazio and French horn player David Wetherill ahead of a concert at Haverford College—which is part of a series that celebrates the bicentennial of Walt Whitman. Debra Lew Harder is host.

Why do we love a good melody? How does a good melody stick in our brains and make us feel things we can’t even put into words? And what does the latest scientific research show about how listening to music and melody improves our overall health?

Listen to the WRTI performance of Jasmine Choi, praised as “the goddess of flute" by Korea Times, with Hugh Sung at the piano in an enchanting program with host Debra Lew Harder.

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