Joseph Haydn

Jessica Griffin/The Philadelphia Orchestra

Back in January, 2016, Yannick Nézet-Séguin and The Philadelphia Orchestra launched a three-week Music of Vienna series, and one of those concerts—both here in Philadelphia at Verizon Hall and at Carnegie Hall in New York—Yannick conducted two works composed nearly a century apart: Haydn’s 103rd symphony, and Bruckner’s 4th.

July 20, 2020. The last complete set of string quartets that Josef Haydn composed, a set of six, Op. 76, are among his most ambitious chamber works, deviating from their predecessors in their near-continual exchange of motifs between instruments.

The symphony, as we know it today, underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


Daryn Stumbaugh/ Unsplash

Three years after the great success of his 1798 work The Creation, Joseph Haydn premiered another large oratorio, this time celebrating nature throughout the year. While not often performed today, The Seasons is still a tour de force with an enthusiastic following. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

Henning Ross / Sony Classical

The vast canvas of an oratorio that begins with the turn from Winter to Spring, and progresses through Summer, Autumn, and Winter, The Seasons, by Joseph Haydn, expands this Sunday, June 30th's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on WRTI 90.1 to three hours, from 1 to 4 PM.

Patrick Allen - Opera Omnia

The British pianist Benjamin Grosvenor and the French-born conductor Nathalie Stutzmann are in the spotlight for this Philadelphia Orchestra In Concert broadcast on WRTI 90.1 on April 7th from 1 to 3 PM.

The Symphony's Declaration of Independence

Oct 3, 2017

Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, Oct. 7th, 5 to 6 pm. Joseph Haydn (1732–1809) is the “Father of the Symphony” in the same way that George Washington (born the same year) is the “Father of our Country.” Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence, and he and others generated the Constitution and other central documents, but Washington’s leadership was the foundation on which the country was built. Similarly, the symphony owes its early growth to Haydn.

Jessica Griffin/The Philadelphia Orchestra

Vienna was a hotbed of musical evolution, and the second concert in the Philadelphia Orchestra’s three-part series of the Music of Vienna shows us how far the symphony traveled in that time. On Sunday, September 4th at 1 pm, Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphians bring you two symphonies composed about 80 years apart: Joseph Haydn’s 103rd, the famous “Drumroll” Symphony, and Anton Bruckner’s 4th.

Portrait by Thomas Hardy, 1791

Join us on Sunday from 5 to 6 pm as we present August’s concert broadcast by the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, opening with an archival recording made at the Walnut Street Theater, with the orchestra’s founder and then–music director Marc Mostovoy conducting. Current music director Dirk Brossé conducts the second half of the program, which was recorded at the Kimmel Center’s Perelman Theater in February, 2011.

Yannick Nezet-Seguin conducts works by Haydn, Beethoven, and Vaughan Williams on this Sunday's Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast - a live concert recording from March, 2015 at Verizon Hall.

You'll hear one of Haydn’s most ambitious essays, the Symphony No. 92, known as the “Oxford” because he conducted a performance at the illustrious University in July 1791, when he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Music.

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