J.S. Bach

May 13, 2019. Himmelsmusik, German for “heavenly music," is the latest project of Austrian theorbo player Christina Pluhar and her early-music ensemble L’Arpeggiata, based in France.

May 6, 2019. Pianist Angela Hewitt recently tweeted, "Seems I'm married to #Bach. Well, I've spent more time with him than anybody else, that's for sure."

Jan Regan/Philadelphia Orchestra

The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast for Sunday, May 5th at 1 PM brings us music by two composers born almost 150 years apart, and both of whose music expresses profound religious faith.

Here's a delicious side dish to your weekday mornings! By popular demand, Gregg Whiteside brings you music by Johann Sebastian Bach every weekday at 8:06 AM on WRTI 90.1.

Johann Sebastian Bach wrote his St. Matthew Passion for a single purpose — to present the Passion story in music at Good Friday vesper services.

Bach's Passion continues to move audiences nearly three centuries after it was first heard in St. Thomas's Church in Leipzig, Germany. Standing as one of the pillars of Western sacred music, it is at once monumental and intimate, deeply sorrowful and powerful.

In case you missed it, here's the amazing Google Doodle celebrating Bach's 334th birthday. You can easily compose a two-measure melody and then share it! It's the first artificial-intelligence powered Google Doodle.

Listen to the WRTI performance of Jasmine Choi, praised as “the goddess of flute" by Korea Times, with Hugh Sung at the piano in an enchanting program with host Debra Lew Harder.

Kenneth Hutchins

Cellist Dale Henderson began performing Bach’s Cello Suites in the subways of New York City in 2010, determined to spread the wonders of Bach. Today, Henderson's project— Bach in the Subways— has grown exponentially as thousands mark Bach's birthday week with free performances in subways, and other public venues across the globe.

January 14, 2019. Fresh, emotional, crystalline as glacial water — these are words to describe Icelandic pianist Vikingur Ólafsson’s stunning recording, released this season by Deutsche Grammophon, of music of Johann Sebastian Bach.

Peter Miller

Hilary Hahn's love for J.S. Bach goes way back. She began learning solo sonatas and partitas when she was nine years old. And thanks to her teacher Jascha Brodsky at the Curtis Institute of Music, some solo Bach was at every lesson. 

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