Ludwig van Beethoven

Courtesy of The Philadelphia Orchestra Association Archives

During the Cultural Revolution of 1966 to 1976 in the People's Republic of China, Western classical music all but disappeared from Chinese cultural life. The Philadelphia Orchestra's trailblazing 1973 trip to China helped turn that around. Led by Music Director Eugene Ormandy, and part of a larger plan of cross-cultural exchange, the tour planted the seeds for a relationship between China and the Orchestra that has grown and blossomed in the last three decades.

Stanley Gordon

Beethoven. Sure, he was the deaf, scowling musical genius with the wild hair. But those who knew him thought of him a little differently. We’ll take a look at some little-known quirks of the great composer, culled from documented recollections of his friends and acquaintances, biographies, and my conversation with John Suchet, author of Beethoven: The Man Revealed.

Getty Images/Andreas Rentz

Join us as we mark the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven with some of his most treasured works, as well as much that he inspired in the generations that followed.

Ludwig van Beethoven, who lived from 1770 to 1827, is one of the most popular composers of all time.  Although he began to lose his hearing in his late 20s, and went completely deaf by his mid 40s, his deafness did nothing to defeat his ability to compose. Beethoven’s influence around the globe has not been hampered by geography, wars. or even pandemics. Let’s examine the pervasive appeal of Beethoven, which has transformed him from musical genius to Promethean hero to demigod.

Dario Acosta

Join us on Sunday, December 6th at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1 and Monday, December 7th at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2 to hear a 2018 concert broadcast from the Orchestra’s British Isles Festival conducted by Fabio Luisi.

Credit: Benjamin Ealovega

Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony highlights this Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast from 2016 on Sunday, October 4th at 1 PM on WRTI and Monday, October 5th at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2. But there’s so much more. The Violin Concerto of John Williams and Ravel’s well-loved Pavane round out a brilliant program conducted by Stéphane Denève, who recently finished his tenure as the Orchestra’s Principal Guest Conductor.

Jan Regan

  

The Philadelphia Orchestra and Yannick Nézét-Seguin present a symphonic journey on Sunday, September 6th at 1 PM on 90.1, and Monday, September 7th at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2 that begins with a world premiere, and then traverses both the 5th and 6th symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven.

Wikipedia Commons

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony premiered in 1808 and was praised as "one of the most important works of the time" by critic E.T.A. Hoffman. WRTI’s Susan Lewis explores why, in the more than 200 years since, the work retains its extraordinary appeal.


Benjamin Ealovega

On Friday, March 27th at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1, our Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast from 2019 brings pianist Jonathan Biss to the stage, for a performance of Robert Schumann’s Piano Concerto in A minor, a work that transports the piano concerto into the realm of symphonic music. Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts.

Pianist Xun Pan is in the WRTI performance studio to warm us up for the 250th anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s birth, which is coming up in December. WRTI"s Kevin Gordon is host.

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