Matt Silver

Philadelphia's Best Of The Bass, Part 1 includes WRTI's 8 favorite bebop and hard bop players. Philadelphia's Best Of The Bass, Part 2 features some of the most impactful jazz, rock, funk, and fusion bassists to have come out of Philly. This final installment of the series showcases artists at the crossroads of jazz, pop, hip-hop, and R&B.


Courtesy of the artist

Since 2017, Slingshot—a collaboration between NPR Music and the digital music service VuHaus—has provided a platform where 'taste-making' music stations share stories about the music scene and emerging artists in their communities. Now, Slingshot is shining a spotlight on jazz in Philadelphia: its history, its present, and its future, with stories produced by WRTI.

This is a glimpse, a cross-section of some of the most impactful bass players to have come out of Philadelphia. Sometimes their respective impacts were local, sometimes national, sometimes global. Collectively, they've excelled in several different eras and idioms, from bebop and hard bop, to free jazz and post-bop and fusion, all the way through Philly Soul and R&B to hip-hop.

Weather Report founder Joe Zawinul once famously declared that the city produced "the world's greatest bassists." This list will show you why.

Philadelphia's Best Of The Bass, Part 1 includes WRTI's 8 favorite bebop and hard bop players. The list of some of the most impactful bass players to have come out of Philadelphia continues with this group of jazz, rock, funk, and fusion bassists.


March 2, 2020. Wayne Shorter’s music has long deserved big band treatment, and in 2015 it finally got it—from the world’s most prestigious big band, the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra (JLCO). Then 81, Shorter joined the Wynton Marsalis-led JLCO on stage for three consecutive nights, producing unforgettable live shows and a new album: The Music of Wayne Shorter.

Homer Jackson

Homer Jackson, director of the Philadelphia Jazz Project, is very interested in Walt Whitman these days. And he’d like you to join him in celebrating Whitman’s 200th birthday by taking a long summer’s walk with him. And maybe singing a little if you’re up to it.

Courtesy of Patricia Haddad

Vocalist and pianist Patricia Haddad has been a pillar of the Brazilian bossa nova scene in Philadelphia for over 30 years, along with her husband, Orlando Haddad. Their Grammy-nominated duo, MINAS, has released a half-dozen albums and played everywhere from the Kennedy Center to WRTI’s Performance Studio.