Miles Davis

Jimmy Cobb, whose subtle and steady drumming formed the pulse of some of jazz's most beloved recordings, died at his home in Manhattan on Sunday. He was 91.

The cause was lung cancer, says his wife, Eleana Tee Cobb.

Cobb was the last surviving member of what's often called Miles Davis' First Great Sextet. He held that title for almost three decades, serving as a conduit for many generations of jazz fans into the band that recorded the music's most iconic and enduring album, Kind of Blue.

You don't have to look far, in 2019, to encounter the mystique of trumpeter Miles Davis. This month Rhino released Rubberband, a previously unheard, posthumously refurbished pop-funk studio album recorded in 1985.

September 23, 2019. Imagine Sting playing just one more sold-out gig with Stewart Copeland and Andy Summers as The Police. Or maybe Alexander Hamilton and George Washington getting together to teach the new country they built how to say goodbye, just "one last time."

Courtesy of Philadelphia Film Society

WRTI 90.1 and the Philadelphia Film Society are proud to present a weeklong screening of the new documentary film MILES DAVIS: BIRTH OF THE COOL from September 13th to 19th at the Roxy Theater, 2023 Sansom Street, near Rittenhouse Square.

Fifty years ago this August, Miles Davis assembled a group of musicians to record the sprawling, groundbreaking album Bitches Brew. With the sounds of Jimi Hendrix, Sly & the Family Stone and James Brown in his head, Davis plugged in and brought these electric rock sensibilities to jazz.

July 29, 2019. An album of vocal duets isn't the most common thing in jazz, and perhaps with good reason. The jazz sensibility tends to eschew the gimmicky, the overly sweet, the un-ironically corny. But the new collaboration between pianist—now, also, vocalist—Kevin Hays and vocalist Chiara Izzi, Across the Sea, may well prove among the exceptions.

Snupps

April is Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM), and this year marks the 60th anniversary of the most influential year in jazz, 1959. Each week we've highlighted one of the game-changing albums that left an indelible mark in jazz history, and changed the course of its future.

April is Jazz Appreciation Month, and WRTI is celebrating throughout the month with music that showcases one of the most magical and innovative years of jazz—1959, which was 60 years ago.

April is Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM), and this year marks the 60th anniversary of the most influential year in jazz, 1959. Each week we will highlight one of the game changing albums that left an indelible mark in jazz history, and changed the course of its future. 

Photo by Brian McMillen / brianmcmillen@hotmail.com

Bob Dorough, who was famous for all of his beloved Schoolhouse Rock! compositions, was also a seasoned jazz musician for decades. He died on April 23, 2018 at age 94. WRTI's Bob Craig had the chance to chat with him in 2013 when he was in town.

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