Nat King Cole

Freddy Cole, whose debonair yet unassuming vocal style lighted his way through a distinguished jazz career, in and out of the shadow of his older brother Nat “King” Cole, died on Saturday at his home in Atlanta, Ga.

December 9, 2019. The archival masters at Resonance Records are at it again, this time with an ambitious project to celebrate the centennial of the great Nat “King” Cole. Hittin’ the Ramp: The Early Years (1936 to 1943), gives an in-depth account of the youthful years of the hit-maker, before he made any big hits.

Called "the best friend a song ever had," Nathaniel Adams Cole was such a huge success in popular music that Capitol Records became known as “The House that Nat Built.” He was a leading jazz pianist, but it was his light and liquid singing of “Mona Lisa,” “Nature Boy,” and many other hits that won millions of fans in three decades. He's your No. 8 Essential Jazz Artist on WRTI 90.1

In 1946, Nat King Cole became the first recording artist to wrap his lush vocals around what would become a standard of the holiday season, "The Christmas Song." But that song was written by a different crooner: Mel Tormé.

NPR's Noel King spoke with Mel Tormé's youngest son, James — an accomplished jazz singer himself — to get the story behind the creation of this Christmas classic.

Jazz pianist and singer Nat "King" Cole, the first African American to host his own TV variety show in 1956, was known for his great talent and his grace, even in the face of mistreatment and racial discrimination. WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports on a new play that explores what this grace must have cost him.

Cookin' Up Some Delicious Jazz Songs

Oct 23, 2017

Goblins and Ghosts. Mermaids and Princesses. Trick-or-treat comes next week and WRTI is getting ready to pass out tasty jazz nuggets. Here are some sweet indulgences – on the musical side.