Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Courtesy of the artist

On May 19th at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1, you're in for a special treat. Before intermission of this Philadelphia Orchestra In Concert broadcast, you'll hear Mozart’s Masonic Funeral Music and 25th Symphony, and after the break, Mozart's Requiem.

Scott Rodgerson/Unsplash

Wolfgang Amadeua Mozart died in 1791 at age 35, before he finished his Requiem mass. But it wasn't the only funeral music he composed. WRTI's Susan Lewis has more on an earlier work that provides context for his musical journey. 

Need some extra cheer during the workday? How about a little Mozart? We're now bringing you a Mozart favorite every weekday at 1 pm except for Wednesdays when we feature At Your Request Midday Mozart is the perfect pick-me-up to ward off those post-lunch doldrums.

Listen to five Resident Artists from the Academy of Vocal Arts (AVA) sing LIVE in the WRTI 90.1 Performance Studio. WRTI's Gregg Whiteside is host as singers perform duet, trio, and quintet highlights from AVA's current production of Mozart's Cosi fan tutte.

March 4, 2019. The three last symphonies by Mozart are considered by many the pinnacle of his symphonic writing, and have been recorded by countless orchestras and conductors. Now, a recently formed French music group, Ensemble Appassionato, led by their founder and music director Mathieu Herzog, have come out with their own version of Mozart’s Symphonies 39, 40 and 41, released just last month by Naïve records.

Jessica Griffin

Hollywood may have typecast the bassoon as comedic star, but Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Bassoon Daniel Matsukawa fills us in on the instrument’s great lyrical expressiveness. WRTI's Susan Lewis has the story.

Credit: Joseph Lange

Mozart mentioned in a letter to his father that he wanted to write a mass for his new wife Constanze, who was a soprano. “But there was no commission,” says Temple University music history professor Steven Zohn. “It’s not usual for him to write something on spec or just because he wanted to write something that showed the love for his wife.”

Join us as Curtis Institute of Music students perform live from the WRTI Performance Studio. It's a preview of their Saturday, November 17th two-part recital at the Gould Rehearsal Hall in Lenfest Hall at 1616 Locust Street in Philadelphia.

October 15, 2018. Pianist Cyrus Chestnut has always been known for swinging us right to church. On Kaleidoscope, he does a bit of that, but mostly adds his touch to the work of classical composers. Bassist Eric Wheeler and drummer Chris Beck help to identify the different styles Chestnut tackles on this album.

That’s right, you voted Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), your No. 1 most essential classical composer. His symphonies, operas, concertos, and compositions, in every genre of the time, remain to this day an incredible marvel of genius. And today is the wunderkind from Salzburg's birthday! So we're celebrating with a morning of music devoted exclusively to the great composer.

Pages