Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Hans Van Der Woerd

Join us on Sunday, May 9 at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1 and Monday, May 10 at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2 to hear this 2016 Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast with pianist Hélène Grimaud who performs a concerto close to her heart—the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 2.

Credit: Jessica Griffin

Paul Jacobs, the only organist ever to have won a Grammy Award, will perform in all three works on our Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast on Sunday, April 25th at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1 and Monday, April 26th at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2.

Credit: Jeff Herman

Music can be mysterious, even to those who spend their lives creating it. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the late composer Christopher Rouse pondered the profound power of music with his concerto for organ and orchestra.

Marco Borggreve

Join us on Sunday, April 11th at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1 and Monday, April 12th at 7 PM on WRTI HD-2 to hear this Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast from 2016. All three of the works on the program were composed in Paris within a five-year period (1928-33), one by a German, another by a Frenchman, and the last by an American. And they all marvelously combine elements of serious composition with popular influences, notably from jazz.

April 12, 2021. Sergei Rachmaninoff considered The Philadelphia Orchestra his favorite American ensemble, and our Classical Album of the Week reveals why.

Dario Acosta

The 2019-2020 Philadelphia Orchestra season was built around two themes – BeethovenNow (in the 250th anniversary year of his birth), and WomenNOW. And our Sunday, April 18th re-broadcast at 1 PM on WRTI 90.1 and repeated on Monday, April 19th at 7 PM on HD-2 begins and ends with compositions by French women of the 19th and early-20th centuries, with Beethoven right in the middle.

Wikimedia Commons, Artist Unknown

In the mid-19th century, there were few performance opportunities for large-scale works by women composers. Today, a symphony composed in the 1840s by French pianist, teacher and composer Louise Farrenc is finally getting well-deserved attention on the concert stage in Philadelphia.

Getty Images/Libray of Congress

The success of “Mack the Knife,” composed in 1928, and other popular music written by 20th-century German-Jewish composer Kurt Weill overshadowed his orchestral and classical work. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more on his second symphony, and why it was not heard for decades.

Unsplash

WRTI is happy to bring you this festive re-broadcast of The Philadelphia Orchestra performing Handel’s Messiah on Easter Sunday, April 4th from 1 to 4 PM on WRTI 90.1, and Monday, April 5th from 7 to 10 PM on WRTI HD-2.

Henning Ross / Sony Classical

Join us on Sunday, March 21 from 1 to 4 PM on WRTI 90.1 and Monday, March 22 from 7 to 10 PM on WRTI HD-2 as we go back in time to late 2017 to hear a concert recorded live in Verizon Hall. The Philadelphia Orchestra performs Joseph Haydn's The Seasons—a vast canvas of an oratorio that begins with the turn from winter to spring, and progresses through summer, autumn, and winter.

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