Classical At Your Request

Wednesday, 12 noon to 3 pm

Every Wednesday from noon to 3 pm, you decide what we play on Classical At Your Request! Using the form below, tell us what you’d like to hear. We compile all the requests every Wednesday morning by about 11 am, and then play as many as we can fit in from noon to 3.

Join the fun! Fill out the form here and we’ll do our best to get your selection on the air! Complete Playlists for each show are listed at the very bottom of this post.

September 10, 2018. A happy and healthy New Year to all our listeners celebrating the Jewish High Holidays! And for ALL our listeners, here’s our delightful Album of the Week: Between Worlds with Israeli mandolinist Avi Avital.

Avital is acclaimed for his recordings of Baroque classical masters J.S. Bach and Vivaldi. Between Worlds, released by Deutsche Grammophon in 2014, is something entirely different.

August 27, 2018. Nineteen-year old British cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason has been riding a media wave since winning the BBC Young Musician competition in 2016. Millions watched his performance this past May at the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. Sheku’s debut recording, Inspiration, released earlier this year by London-Decca, is our album of the week.

Are you a basic romantic, a starry-eyed sweetheart, a cranky curmudgeon, or a wizened veteran of love's enduring themes? Let’s hear from you! What concerto, song, movement, or jazz riff pulls on your heartstrings On Wednesday, February 14th we’re devoting our regular jazz and classical request hours to YOUR Valentine’s Day favorites. Tell us what they are! 

This is your opportunity to request the classical piece you want to hear. Join the fun! Fill out the form below, and we'll do our best to include your selection on the next At Your Request show. Thanks!

Playlists for At Your Request are published every Thursday - the day after broadcast. Click here to View Playlists.

A New World Was Needed to Create This Symphony

Apr 27, 2015

A native of Bohemia, Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904) was a minority in the Austrian Empire and in the classical music world. But he had risen to the top of it all when a millionaire patroness hired him to direct the brand-new National Conservatory of Music of America in New York City. It would train all students without regard to race or ability to pay. There, in 1893, Dvořák’s eyes were opened to the possibilities of an "American" music.