Jazz with Bob Perkins

Monday through Thursday, 6 to 9 pm

Lovingly known as “BP with the GM” (Bob Perkins with the Good Music), BP brings you that good music just in time for dinner during your work week. His selections are like a familiar hug from Jazz Land featuring your favorite standards and vocalists such as Sarah, Ella, and Nat, some Big Band legends including the Duke and the Count, and the giants of the instrumentals like Lee Morgan, Hank Crawford, Miles, and Coltrane. Take a listen to "Ol' BP" as he calls himself...you'll be back again and again.

Take a look at this photo album of Mr. Perkins through the years.

Scroll down to see recent playlists.

Whitney Thomas

Songstress Michelle Lordi has blossomed into an artist who is comfortable enough to push the already fluid boundaries of jazz.

February 17, 2020. Philadelphia-based poet, singer, educator and spoken-word curator Yolanda Wisher performs a unique blend of poetry and song with her band, the Afroeaters.

February 17, 2020. At just 37 minutes, and comprising eight takes of only five distinct tunes, it’s hard to categorize John Coltrane’s Blue World as an album, per se.

Two Englishmen, Guy Wood and Robert Mellin, slipped it into the Great American Songbook just before it closed, just as rock rolled over sophistication. It begins from below, a slowly twisting Roman candle of a tune, and explodes in the top range of the singer, as the eyes of onlookers reflect the glory of what songs once were.

February 10, 2020. Born in Brazil and popularized in the United States, bossa nova melds the spicy romance of samba with the principles of jazz. It translates to “new trend,” which is exactly what it was at its emergence in the '50s and '60s. The Little Box of Bossa Nova highlights the different layers of the bossa nova movement in a three-disc set, and provides some lovely Valentine’s vibes.

February 10, 2020. The performative power of Cuban mother/son combo—vocalist Xiomara Laugart and her son, pianist Axel Tosca —is profoundly evident.

Lynn Irving

WRTI's Susan Lewis talks with Joe Bonjiovi, founder and executive director of the National Jazz Festival about why jazz is so important for young people. Young jazz musicians from 11 states and Puerto Rico are coming to Philadelphia for the 2020 festival on February 15th, which features 63 ensembles of high school-age musicians in different categories. 

Sooner or later, every child prodigy hits a fork in the road: Keep doing the crowd-pleasing, trained-seal tricks that brought fame? Or set out to develop a more individual sound?

From the moment 11-year-old Indonesian pianist Joey Alexander gained international attention in 2015, it was clear that he wasn't your average young phenom. He had seemingly limitless technique and a deep understanding of tunes written decades before he was born. Already a fixture in the jazz world with five albums under his belt at only the age of 16, Alexander is clearly charting his own path.

February 3, 2020. Miles Davis once said, “You can tell the history of jazz in four words: Louis Armstrong. Charlie Parker.”

John Lamparski/Getty Images

When I was a kid growing up in South Philly, there was an older fellow down the block who was trying to play an alto saxophone. He wasn't doing well at it.

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