Sunday Jazz Brunch with Bob Perkins

Sunday, 9:00 am To 1:00 pm

"B.P. with the G.M." (Bob Perkins with the Good Music) brings his swinging weeknight approach to Sunday brunch time. Four hours of genuine jazz will put a smile on your face and make you a regular listener.

WRTI's celebration of 100 years of Dave Brubeck continues at 9 AM on Sunday Jazz Brunch with Bob Perkins. And Brubeck isn't the only person to celebrate on December 6th—he shares a birthday with our own BP with the GM! Join us for a double birthday listening party this Sunday, December 6th.

BP's Brush With Brubeck

Nov 29, 2020
Courtesy of Bob Perkins

I believe the year was 1983 when I was asked if I’d like to emcee a concert at the Academy of Music, headlined by Dave Brubeck and his sons and the Modern Jazz Quartet. Without hesitation, the answer was an emphatic yes!

Getty Images/Metronome

It was 1959—a pivotal year for jazz as a whole, but for Dave Brubeck it was utterly life changing. After years of college tours he had a smash hit album, Time Out, with his quartet and has been a household name ever since. Join us starting on Monday, November 30th for a weeklong celebration of the centennial anniversary of the birth of Dave Brubeck. We’ll have special programming leading up to his birthday on Sunday, December 6th.

Wikpedia/U.S. Library of Congress Music Division/ Wiliam R. Gottlieb

Some folks—even jazz fans—wouldn’t know that 'Robert Chudnick' was the real name of the musician whose handle was Red Rodney.  The once well-known jazz trumpeter from Philadelphia was born back on September 27th, 1927.

Charlie Parker, the incandescent avatar of modern jazz, didn't live to see 35. His centennial is upon us, and with it comes a chance to celebrate his legacy — as a quicksilver alto saxophonist, a voracious musical thinker and a crucial link in the chain of jazz tradition. Bird, as he was fondly known, gave us a lexicon as well as a literature. Like Louis Armstrong before him and just a few others since, he redrew the possibilities of the art form, and he did it with absolute panache.

Have you ever discovered that a famous person once lived very close to you?  And all the while, you weren't aware of it—until that person moved away, and the world let you know about the celebrity who had been in your midst. WRTI's Bob Perkins remembers when jazz great Charlie Parker lived in Philadelphia for a time. 

Wikipedia Commons, William P. Gottlieb

The great alto saxophonist and jazz icon Charlie "Yardbird" Parker was only 34 years old when he died in 1955. During his short life, he became one of the most influential improvising soloists in jazz. As we celebrate Bird's 100th birthday week on WRTI starting on August 24th, Jazz Host Bob Perkins talks with Susan Lewis about why he's always been in sync with the music of Charlie Parker.

May 4, 2020. Mother’s Day will be a lot different this year. The jazz brunches that would normally be packed will be replaced by curbside pickup and listening to Sunday Jazz Brunch with Bob Perkins on WRTI 90.1 (not too shabby) while chatting with family via Zoom.

Paul Hoeffler/Getty Images

Many years ago, a group of teenage musicians decided to form a small jazz band in South Philly—they went on to become high-profile players in the jazz world. The band included Albert "Tootie" Heath on drums, Bobby Timmons on piano, Henry Grimes on bass fiddle, Ted Curson on trumpet, Richard “Buzzy” Wilson on alto sax, and Sam Reed on tenor sax.

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