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Arts Desk

Finding New Dimensions in Chamber Music

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Dolce Suono's repertoire spans a range of works from Baroque to contemporary, for two to 11 musicians, with various combinations of instruments.

Chamber music, played by small ensembles, one player to a part, and without a conductor, is an intimate and engaging art form. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, it can also provide insight into history and human emotions.  

For flutist and music historian Mimi Stillman, chamber music is a way to explore important issues "that illuminate how people thought at a given time."

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Flutist Mimi Stillman sat down with WRTI's Susan Lewis to talk about chamber music.

Stillman founded the chamber ensemble Dolce Suono in 2005, which has blossomed into a busy repertory style ensemble, with a home series, tour schedule and outreach activities. Its repertoire spans a range of  works from Baroque to contemporary, for two to 11 musicians, with various combinations of instruments. Using historical themes, Dolce Suono has shed light on existing lesser-known works, such as a piece for flute and piano by Russian composer Mieczyslaw Weinberg, that was suppressed by the Soviets.

Dolce Suono’s 10th anniversary season begins on Sunday, October 12th with a 3 pm concert at Curtis Institute of Music's Field Concert Hall, featuring selected works from its first decade, and returning guest artists.

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Listen to more of Susan Lewis' interview with Mimi Stillman, founder of Dolce Suono.