Susan Lewis

Arts & Culture Senior Producer

Susan is an arts and culture reporter for WRTI. She contributes Arts Desk features, and weekly intermission interviews for The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast series on WRTI with host Gregg Whiteside.

She is also a freelance essayist, journalist, and speechwriter who has written about Philadelphia for Insight Guides and Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation's Culture Files.  A former columnist for Philadelphia Magazine, she is the author of Reinventing Ourselves after Motherhood and a book of essays. Her work has appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer, Child Magazine, Parents Magazine, Reader's Digest and Ladies' Home Journal (Parents Digest).

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Susan is also a lawyer, with a B.A. in Philosophy from Trinity College, Connecticut, and a J.D. from New York University School of Law. She has practiced law in New York City and taught entertainment law at Rutgers Law School in Camden.

Ways to Connect

The wise 92-year-old, internationally renowned conductor Herbert Blomstedt said recently in an interview:  “Music is a very spiritual art. I don’t say religious; it’s spiritual, because music exists only in the air.”

Bram Goots

An opera-ballet about a child and his enchanted toys and animals came into being in the wake of World War I. Maurice Ravel's L'enfant et les sortileges, or "the Child and the Spells" explores human cruelty and kindness through the eyes of a child. 

Heidi Kaden/Unsplash

While we practice important social distancing to keep everyone healthy and safe, we don’t have to be isolated. We can share in the experience of listening to great music, much of it created by musicians in our own region.

Maurice Jerry Beznos

Pianist Emanual Ax, known both for both his virtuosity and genuine good nature, is drawn to the power and genius of Beethoven. You wouldn't know, just from talking to him, that he's one of today's great pianists.

Celebrate the season with us as we look back to Craft Works Music's visit to the WRTI Performance Studio last year to sing madrigals and other works inspired by springtime. WRTI's Susan Lewis is host. 

Wikipedia Commons

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony premiered in 1808 and was praised as "one of the most important works of the time" by critic E.T.A. Hoffman. WRTI’s Susan Lewis explores why, in the more than 200 years since, the work retains its extraordinary appeal.


March 9, 2020. In For Love of You, pianist Lara Downes pays homage to the 19th-century pianist and composer Clara Wieck Schumann, playing solo piano works created by both Clara and Robert Schumann during a forbidden love affair before they eventually married.  

Conrad Erb Photography

The Chestnut Street Singers were live from WRTI's Performance Studio in advance of their March 6th and 8th concerts celebrating the past and future of their ensemble, now in its 10th season. WRTI's Susan Lewis, host.

In the mid-19th century, there were few performance opportunities for large-scale works by women composers. Today, a symphony composed in the 1840s by French pianist, teacher and composer Louise Farrenc is finally getting well-deserved attention on the concert stage in Philadelphia.

Charles Boudreau

Described by NPR as “one of today’s most eclectic composers,” Vivian Fung’s inspirations range from ancient gamelon music to ideas for preparing pot roast (for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, no less!)

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