Susan Lewis

Arts & Culture Senior Producer

Susan is an arts and culture reporter for WRTI. She contributes Arts Desk features, and weekly intermission interviews for The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert broadcast series on WRTI with host Gregg Whiteside.

She is also a freelance essayist, journalist, and speechwriter who has written about Philadelphia for Insight Guides and Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation's Culture Files.  A former columnist for Philadelphia Magazine, she is the author of Reinventing Ourselves after Motherhood and a book of essays. Her work has appeared in The Philadelphia Inquirer, Child Magazine, Parents Magazine, Reader's Digest and Ladies' Home Journal (Parents Digest).

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Susan is also a lawyer, with a B.A. in Philosophy from Trinity College, Connecticut, and a J.D. from New York University School of Law. She has practiced law in New York City and taught entertainment law at Rutgers Law School in Camden.

Ways to Connect

September 16, 2019. Jazz trumpeter and composer Wynton Marsalis writes about reconnecting with the Anglo-Celtic roots of Afro-American music in his Violin Concerto in D, written for Scottish violin virtuoso Nicola Benedetti, and recorded with The Philadelphia Orchestra under the baton of Cristian Măcelaru. The celebration of community and joining of different musical traditions also enriches his Fiddle Dance Suite for solo violin. 

Bettmann/Getty Images

In the early years of the Cold War, with tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union at all-time high, a tune by Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev became the unlikely theme song for a radio drama about FBI cases involving international espionage. 

Courtesy of Opera Philadelphia

Cast members of Opera Philadelphia's upcoming production of Sergei Prokofiev’s The Love for Three Oranges visit WRTI 90.1 to perform highlights from the comic opera—one of several productions featured in Opera Philadelphia's Festival 019 from Sept. 18th to 29th. WRTI's Susan Lewis is host.

Choumoff/Roger Viollett via Getty Images

The Philadelphia Orchestra's semi-staged version of Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet from this past May featured much of the music from the ballet, with dancers from Brian Sanders' company JUNK often moving high above the orchestra. WRTI's Susan Lewis spoke with Yannick Nézet-Séguin about the experience.

Jessica Griffin/Philadelphia Orchestra

Composer and jazz trumpeter Hannibal Lokumbe has written Healing Tones as a hymn to Philadelphia, an oratorio-like work that celebrates the healers among us, including midwives, doctors, artists and musicians.

Opera Philadelphia is creating vital new works and interpreting traditional pieces with a contemporary lens. This year's Festival O19 is an example of how the company's innovative approach is fueling an exciting opera renaissance, and redefining the genre for the 21st century.

You can see Opera Philadelphia’s recent revival of La bohème under the stars on Independence Mall on September 14th at 7 PM. This year's Opera on the Mall features a screening of the beloved Puccini blockbuster.

Magnus Andersen

While the history of the organ is steeped in majesty and tradition, modern organs are being used to express a range of new sounds. WRTI’s Susan Lewis spoke with soloist James McVinnie about the organ and its starring role in Register, Nico Muhly’s new concerto.

Listen to a sampling of new music that teenage girls have written as part of the Young Women Composers Camp, now in progress on the campus of Temple University.

Andrew Bogard

As he wrapped up his third and final year as assistant conductor at The Philadelphia Orchestra, Kensho Watanabe talked with Susan Lewis about his unusual path to the podium.

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