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Jim Zarroli 2010

Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is an NPR correspondent based in New York. He covers economics and business news.

Over the years, he has reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders, and Ponzi schemers. Most recently, he has focused on trade and the job market. He also worked as part of a team covering President Trump's business interests.

Before moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position, he reported from the United Nations and was also involved in NPR's coverage of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings, and the Fukushima earthquake.

Before joining NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

He lives in Manhattan, loves to read, and is a devoted (but not at all fast) runner.

Zarroli grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, in a family of six kids and graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

  • Republicans are attacking President Obama and his team for allegedly saying they wanted energy prices to go up. The president scoffs at the charge. But some environmentalists say higher energy prices would be a good thing because they would spur the development of alternative technologies.
  • Support for Rick Santorum's presidential campaign has been driven by his conservative stances on social issues. But when it comes to economic matters, his record is more mixed. Some conservatives say that on issues like government spending and trade he has sometimes betrayed free-market principles.
  • For weeks, it has been assumed that the owners of Greek government bonds would go along with the bond swap deal that was worked out last month. Now there are signs that some bondholders don't like the size of the loss they're in for.
  • The White House says restoring the U.S. manufacturing sector is an essential part of getting the economy back on track. GOP candidate Rick Santorum also wants to see tax breaks for manufacturing companies. But economists say tax breaks may not be the best way to help manufacturers.
  • The resolution of the Greek debt crisis will depend, in part, on whether bondholders can be persuaded to take big losses on their holdings. At this point, it appears that most are willing to take their lumps and move on. But if enough of them balk at the settlement, it could tip Greece into default.
  • The Obama administration claims health insurance companies won't have a problem providing free contraceptive coverage for women who work at religious groups because it is much cheaper for the industry when pregnancies are planned.