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Sonari Glinton 2010

Sonari Glinton

Sonari Glinton is a NPR Business Desk Correspondent based at our NPR West bureau. He covers the auto industry, consumer goods, and consumer behavior, as well as marketing and advertising for NPR and Planet Money.

In this position, which he has held since late 2010, Glinton has tackled big stories including GM's road back to profitability and Toyota's continuing struggles. In addition, Glinton covered the 2012 presidential race, the Winter Olympics in Sochi, as well as the U.S. Senate and House for NPR.

Glinton came to NPR in August 2007 and worked as a producer for All Things Considered. Over the years Glinton has produced dozen of segments about the great American Song Book and pop culture for NPR's signature programs most notably the 50 Great Voices piece on Nat King Cole feature he produced for Robert Siegel.

Glinton began his public radio career as an intern at Member station WBEZ in Chicago. He worked his way through his public radio internships working for Chicago Jazz impresario Joe Segal, waiting tables and meeting legends such as Ray Brown, Oscar Brown Jr., Marian MacPartland, Ed Thigpen, Ernestine Andersen, and Betty Carter.

Glinton attended Boston University. A Sinatra fan since his mid-teens, Glinton's first forays into journalism were album revues and a college jazz show at Boston University's WTBU. In his spare time Glinton indulges his passions for baking, vinyl albums, and the evolution of the Billboard charts.

  • Despite the excitement surrounding actor and activist George Clooney's visit to Washington, D.C., this week, there's nothing new about stars testifying before Congress. As celebrities get more involved in politics, can their star power still draw an audience for a worthy cause?
  • Redistricting forced Rep. Dennis Kucinich to run against another incumbent Democrat in the primary, and he lost. But a reporter who's watched his career says not to count Kucinich out — losing isn't the strangest or worst thing to happen to the lifelong politician.
  • Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum are battling for Tuesday's Republican primary, and polls show the candidates are neck-and-neck. One group that Romney appears to have an advantage with is Roman Catholic voters despite the fact Romney is Mormon and Santorum Catholic.
  • Congress appears to have avoided another fight over the payroll tax reduction that has been pumping billions of dollars back into the economy. There may even be a deal ahead on jobless benefits and payments to Medicare doctors. Those issues had Congress in knots back in December.