Bob Perkins

John Lamparski/Getty Images

When I was a kid growing up in South Philly, there was an older fellow down the block who was trying to play an alto saxophone. He wasn't doing well at it.

If you're looking for BP with the GM, never fear, Bob Perkins is still here! He's back on the radio starting on January 2nd, 2020 at 6 PM.

Our very own "BP with the GM" shared his story, going back to childhood, with a large audience at the Athenaeum of Philadelphia on Feb. 22, 2019.  If you couldn't make it, lend Bob your "finely tuned ears" to hear this interesting reminiscence of his life in radio.

In his 50th year on the radio in Philadelphia, WRTI Jazz Host Bob Perkins (BP with the GM) is sharing his story with anyone who'll lend him their "finely tuned ears." He's the guest speaker at the Athenaeum of Philadelphia on Friday, February 22 at 3 PM. It's a free event, and open to the public.

Kevin Burkett/Wikimedia Commons


Music, spectacular costumes, and strutting down Broad Street? It must be New Year's Day in Philadelphia with the Mummers Parade!

Bob Perkins remembered the iconic jazz pianist and composer Dave Brubeck, when he died on December 5, 2012 at age 91—one day shy of his 92nd birthday.

Getty Images

Jazz musician Cornelius (Sonny) Fortune died on October 25th, at age 79. Sonny's biography reveals he was a man in perpetual motion, allowing no grass to grow under his feet when it came to perfecting his craft. He used his time and talents wisely and well.

Okayplayer

News of the death of jazz trumpeter Roy Hargrove sent shock waves through the jazz community, and even provoked concern among those not into jazz music. There was natural wonder about why he died so young.

Kim Tucker

The passing of Don Gardner earlier this week has his legions of loved ones and friends bewildered, because his death was both surprising and sudden.

Louis Armstrong was to jazz what Einstein was to physics, King to Civil Rights, Shakespeare to comedy and tragedy, and Oprah to televised entertainment. He taught the trumpet to do things the instrument didn't know it was capable of doing, and he could turn a song upside down with that deep, gravelly voice.

Pages