Sergei Prokofiev

Nicolas Bets

In 1921, Sergei Prokofiev himself described his 3rd Piano Concerto as 'devilishly difficult' as he prepared to play the premiere in Chicago. One hundred years later, it's among the most popular works in the genre, with ideas that are ever relevant. WRTI's Susan Lewis has more.

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In the early years of the Cold War, with tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union at all-time high, a tune by Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev became the unlikely theme song for a radio drama about FBI cases involving international espionage. 

Courtesy of Opera Philadelphia

Cast members of Opera Philadelphia's upcoming production of Sergei Prokofiev’s The Love for Three Oranges visit WRTI 90.1 to perform highlights from the comic opera—one of several productions featured in Opera Philadelphia's Festival 019 from Sept. 18th to 29th. WRTI's Susan Lewis is host.

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The Philadelphia Orchestra's semi-staged version of Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet from this past May featured much of the music from the ballet, with dancers from Brian Sanders' company JUNK often moving high above the orchestra. WRTI's Susan Lewis spoke with Yannick Nézet-Séguin about the experience.

May 28, 2018.  Discovering this album is really quite a treat.  On Prokofiev for Two pianist Martha Argerich is joined by Armenian-born American pianist Sergei Babayan in his transcriptions for two pianos.  Together, they play some of Prokofiev’s best-loved music. 

Jessica Griffin/The Philadelphia Orchestra

March 19, 2018. As if Yannick Nézet-Séguin weren’t busy enough with The Philadelphia Orchestra, the Met Opera, his Orchestre Métropolitain, and the Rotterdam Philharmonic! He’s also been recording regularly with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Yannick’s latest venture with that group is Visions of Prokofiev, featuring superstar violinist Lisa Batiashvili.

On Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, Saturday, December 2nd, 5 to 6 pm... We celebrated anniversaries throughout 2017: the 100th of the births of Robert Ward and Richard Yardumian, the 150th of Charles Koechlin and Wilhelm Peterson-Berger, the 200th of Niels Gade, and the 300th of Johann Stamitz.

This Sunday on WRTI, it's a Philadelphia Orchestra concert from last April at Verizon Hall with Conductor-in-Residence Cristian Măcelaru on the podium. The program begins with Sergei Prokofiev’s sparkling First Symphony, completed the summer before Russian revolutionary upheavals led to his departure from his native country for nearly two decades.

Christopher Rouse's Symphony No. 3, which appears on his latest album, contains many levels of meaning. It's an homage to the Russian composer Sergey Prokofiev, whose Second Symphony serves as a structural model for the piece. It's an encoded musical portrait of Rouse's wife. And it's an engaging piece of music even for a listener who possesses none of this background knowledge.

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