Matt Silver

Matt Silver is a writer and broadcaster who has been performing, in one way or another, since his grandparents told him as a toddler that singing "Sunrise, Sunset" in rooms full of strangers was the cool thing to do.

His love of jazz comes from his father, Ken, an accomplished clarinetist, bandleader, and educator, who's passed on his extensive knowledge of the Real Book and an abiding love for jazz tunes with Broadway origins.

In addition to writing for WRTI's Arts Desk, Matt can frequently be heard hosting on the jazz side, whistling Gershwin or Bernstein with gusto, or trying to replicate the sounds of Stan Getz and Larry McKenna on his saxophone, which he's found is a good deal harder than it looks.

He is a proud member of that group of hardy souls who got their start at WRTI hosting Jazz through the Night.
 

Ways to Connect

November 11, 2019. Michaelle Lordi, described by the San Francisco Chronicle as “an emotionally insightful performer with an arrestingly beautiful sound," has a new album, Break Up with the Sound. The title comes from its very first track, “Poor Bird.” The poor bird is Lordi herself, who felt compelled with this— her fourth album—to make a break with the music that, artistically, brought her to this point.

October 28, 2019. While the rest of us wonder how someone named Jazzmeia Horn becomes a musician who actually lives up to such a name, all Ms. Horn does is win awards, tour, and make hit records. Love and Liberation is the follow up to her Grammy-nominated debut, 2017’s A Social Call. And while A Social Call was clearly a massive hit, Horn’s sophomore effort is a lot more personal.

October 14, 2019. Jazz vocalist Sara Gazarek had made five critically acclaimed albums, mostly straight-ahead, light and breezy repertoire that left everyone feeling good. Everyone except Gazarek. The vocalist and composer in her mid 30s was navigating some darker moments, and performing the old stuff didn’t feel authentic anymore.

October 7, 2019. In every jazz fan, there’s a little buffalo soldier; in Monty Alexander, there’s more than just a little. That’s why the Kingston, Jamaica born-and-raised jazz pianist has married the two sides of his musical soul on his latest album Wareika Hill, a reimagining of Thelonious Monk tunes through the lens of the music we most associate with Jamaica: Reggae.

Jimmy Katz

September presented jazz enthusiasts in Philadelphia with a full calendar, with so many events in planetary orbit around the sun that was John Coltrane's 93rd birthday celebration. But September’s got nothing on October.

September 30, 2019. Confessions may be her debut album for Mack Avenue Records, but vocalist Veronica Swift, who is 25 years old, has been doing this jazz thing for a while. Swift had a relatively normal childhood for someone who recorded her first album with saxophonist Richie Cole at age nine and made her first appearance at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola at 11.

September 23, 2019. Imagine Sting playing just one more sold-out gig with Stewart Copeland and Andy Summers as The Police. Or maybe Alexander Hamilton and George Washington getting together to teach the new country they built how to say goodbye, just "one last time."

Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

There’s something about listening to John Coltrane’s “Cousin Mary” that feels like home. No doubt that’s how Coltrane felt about his real-life Cousin Mary (the composition’s inspiration) and the home he shared with her near 33rd and Oxford during his brief but formative residency in Philadelphia.

September 9, 2019. Two things jump out when you look at the cover of Antidote, Chick Corea’s new album: 1) The NEA Jazz Master is very comfortable striking a flamenco pose. 2) For a guy who's 77 (but, really, for any age), the man’s got a terrific head of hair.

August 26, 2019. Saxophonist Dave Wilson may be the coolest thing to come out of Lancaster since Dutch Wonderland—and Dutch Wonderland is pretty cool. For family fun, you can’t beat the log flume. But if the aim is to recreate a sophisticated evening of live jazz in the comfort of your own home, you really can’t beat One Night at Chris’, the fifth recording from The Dave Wilson Quartet.

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