Matt Silver

Matt Silver is a writer and broadcaster who has been performing, in one way or another, since his grandparents told him as a toddler that singing "Sunrise, Sunset" in rooms full of strangers was the cool thing to do.

His love of jazz comes from his father, Ken, an accomplished clarinetist, bandleader, and educator, who's passed on his extensive knowledge of the Real Book and an abiding love for jazz tunes with Broadway origins.

In addition to writing for WRTI's Arts Desk, Matt can frequently be heard hosting on the jazz side, whistling Gershwin or Bernstein with gusto, or trying to replicate the sounds of Stan Getz and Larry McKenna on his saxophone, which he's found is a good deal harder than it looks.

He is a proud member of that group of hardy souls who got their start at WRTI hosting Jazz through the Night.
 

Ways to Connect

September 9, 2019. Two things jump out when you look at the cover of Antidote, Chick Corea’s new album: 1) The NEA Jazz Master is very comfortable striking a flamenco pose. 2) For a guy who's 77 (but, really, for any age), the man’s got a terrific head of hair.

August 26, 2019. Saxophonist Dave Wilson may be the coolest thing to come out of Lancaster since Dutch Wonderland—and Dutch Wonderland is pretty cool. For family fun, you can’t beat the log flume. But if the aim is to recreate a sophisticated evening of live jazz in the comfort of your own home, you really can’t beat One Night at Chris’, the fifth recording from The Dave Wilson Quartet.

August 19, 2019. It would’ve been more than understandable for pianist George Cables to call it quits; retirement almost certainly would’ve been the prudent, pragmatic course for the 74-year-old pianist after losing most of his left leg to a deathly serious health scare.

August 12, 2019. Eyal Vilner grew up in Tel Aviv, loving the music of the swing era. But he didn’t fully appreciate what it meant to swing until he started swing dancing himself. Now, fully indoctrinated, his 16-piece big band is a driving force behind New York City’s surprisingly robust Lindy hop scene. Their latest, Swing Out!, provides a dozen very clear reasons why.

August 5, 2019. There are talented composers and talented instrumentalists, and then there's Victor Gould who happens to be both. On Thoughts Become Things, his third album as a leader, Gould presents complex arrangements written for horns and string quartets and multiple percussionists that display his compositional sophistication. Ultimately, though, it's Gould's own piano playing that is most affecting.

July 29, 2019. An album of vocal duets isn't the most common thing in jazz, and perhaps with good reason. The jazz sensibility tends to eschew the gimmicky, the overly sweet, the un-ironically corny. But the new collaboration between pianist—now, also, vocalist—Kevin Hays and vocalist Chiara Izzi, Across the Sea, may well prove among the exceptions.

Monday, July 22, 2019. Hollywood, California and Levittown, Pennsylvania don't have much in common, though both can stake a claim to saxophonist Bob Sheppard, who's recently released his fifth album as a leader, The Fine Line.

July 15, 2019. Drummer Vince Ector is a grown-up. He lives in New York City, the epicenter of unadulterated ambition. He teaches at Princeton, not really the type of place that evokes the inner child in us all. He plays with the Mingus Big Band and Orrin Evans’s Captain Black Big Band, serious ensembles for the mature and sophisticated plier of one’s craft.

July 8, 2019. When trombonist, vocalist, and bandleader Pete McGuinness was growing up in West Hartford, Connecticut, he wanted to be Duke Ellington. So it’s probably no coincidence that with the release of his third big band album, Along for the Ride, McGuinness shows a musical sensibility that mirrors the Duke’s.

John Herr

June 24, 2019. Legendary for his gifts of vocal improvisation—and for putting lyrics to Oliver Nelson’s “Stolen Moments” and Freddie Hubbard’s “Red Clay”—the late vocalist Mark Murphy, who died in 2015, had a profound impact on the kind of jazz singer Nancy Kelly has become.

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