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Peter Kenyon - 2014

Peter Kenyon

Peter Kenyon is NPR's international correspondent based in Istanbul, Turkey.

Prior to taking this assignment in 2010, Kenyon spent five years in Cairo covering Middle Eastern and North African countries from Syria to Morocco. He was part of NPR's team recognized with two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University awards for outstanding coverage of post-war Iraq.

In addition to regular stints in Iraq, he has followed stories to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Lebanon, Bahrain, Qatar, Algeria, Morocco and other countries in the region.

Arriving at NPR in 1995, Kenyon spent six years in Washington, D.C., working in a variety of positions including as a correspondent covering the US Senate during President Bill Clinton's second term and the beginning of the President George W. Bush's administration.

Kenyon came to NPR from the Alaska Public Radio Network. He began his public radio career in the small fishing community of Petersburg, where he met his wife Nevette, a commercial fisherwoman.

  • As the civilian death toll rises in Syria, there are increased calls to provide arms to the Syrian opposition. Turkey is well-placed to take the lead. But Ankara is thus far reluctant to send arms across the border or use its military to create humanitarian safe zones inside Syria.
  • Once part of Syria, southeastern Turkey's Hatay province is home to a sizable population of Alawites, who have ties to the minority sect across the border, including Syria's ruling Assad family. These complex relationships of history and family are now prompting rising sectarian tensions in Turkey.
  • United Nations envoy Kofi Annan continues talks with the Syrian leadership, hoping to find a way to end the violence of the past year. NPR's Peter Kenyon has the latest.
  • Despite strong rhetoric from some Arab states, the Syrian opposition says it's not seeing many imported weapons, which they say they need. The rebels are expecting more bloodshed and don't understand why they aren't getting more help from abroad.
  • In makeshift field hospitals in Syria, doctors struggle in grim conditions to provide emergency care. Such scenes moved one Syrian doctor in the U.S. to help organize equipment, medicine and training for his violence-wracked homeland.
  • With shells pound opposition fighters and civilians in Syria, the main opposition group has lost some of its most prominent members, who are forming a new organization.
  • The Syrian army has reportedly cut off all escape routes from the rebel-held neighborhood of Baba Amr in Homs. Syrian tanks were seen moving closer to Baba Amr on Thursday, as efforts continued to negotiate a cease-fire to evacuate the wounded, including two Western journalists.
  • Iran's threats to close the strategic Strait of Hormuz have caused oil markets to gyrate, but few think Iran can really deliver on its threat. Also, Gulf states are reassured by promises of international military assistance.