Classical Through the Night on HD-2

Monday though Saturday, 10 pm to 6 am; Sunday, 11 pm to 6 am on HD-2 and the Classical Stream
  • Hosted by Peter Van de Graaf, heard on HD-2 and the classical stream

Host Peter Van de Graaff draws music selections from all eras, but focuses on works from the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic eras. While focusing on the standards of the repertoire, the show goes beyond that and draws from the rich and varied music that comprises all of what we call "classical music," shared in an interesting manner. 

What's the longest-running continuous classical radio series in American broadcast history? The Metropolitan Opera's Saturday matinee broadcasts, launched in 1931! The 86th season of live Saturday broadcasts begins on December 3rd. Full schedule below.

An All-Philadelphia Now Is the Time

Nov 18, 2016

Now Is the Time jumps into the Giving Thanks for Philadelphia weekend on WRTI Saturday, November 19th at 9 pm. All the composers and many of the performers live in and around Philadelphia, or studied here. Retired Haverford College professor Harold Boatrite’s music is always smart and tuneful, and his Sonata for Flute and Piano is no exception. Daniel Kellogg and Zhou Tian both went through Curtis, and both have their works played here by Mimi Stillman, from her CD Odyssey.

John Williams, so famous for his award-winning film scores including Jaws, Star Wars, and Schindler’s List, wrote a violin concerto that transcends the personal story behind it. WRTI’s Susan Lewis has more.

Erik Satie

In June of 1912, Igor Stravinsky premiered the piano version of his daring new work The Rite of Spring, a year before its orchestral unveiling. His piano-playing partner was none other than Claude Debussy. Classical music has never been the same since the public first heard it.

Dario Acosta

Vladimir Jurowski, one of the most sought-after conductors in the world, collaborates with one of the world’s most talented virtuoso pianists, Yefim Bronfman, in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, the “Emperor,” one of the supreme achievements in the genre — this Sunday, September 18th at 1 pm on The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast on WRTI.

 

In 1930, The Philadelphia Orchestra gave a successful U.S. premiere of the 10th symphony of a revered Russian composer—Nikolai Miaskovsky—sometimes called "The Father of the Soviet Symphony." As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the work and the composer, both little known in America in today, are being championed by one of today's leading conductors.

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