Vienna

The symphony, as we know it today, underwent major changes from the end of the 18th to the late 19th century. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, two symphonies from two composers in Vienna during that time illustrate the range of the form.
 


Jan Regan/The Philadelphia Orchestra

With the challenges of pro-Palestinian protests facing the Philadelphia Orchestra’s 2018 Tour of Europe and Israel, could anybody have foreseen the latest obstacle? Displacement from the tour hotel by Vladimir Putin?


Three richly orchestrated works on this Sunday’s Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert re-broadcast complete the series of concerts from last January celebrating the music of Vienna.

Credit Mathias Botho

Join us to hear the first concert in The Philadelphia Orchestra’s "Music of Vienna" series, recorded live last January at Verizon Hall. Pianist Jan Lisiecki, an audience favorite at only 20 years old, will be the soloist in Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4.

Mention the music of Vienna, and some of us automatically think of a waltz. But as WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, the city was a musical magnet for composers, especially from the late 18th century through the 19th and beyond.


A young conductor, trained in both his native Colombia and Vienna, now leads orchestras on two continents. As WRTI’s Susan Lewis reports, culture, intellect and passion are all part of his approach to music.

Listen to The Philadelphia Orchestra in Concert on WRTI on Sunday, April 10th at 1 pm to hear Andres Orozco-Estrada lead the Orchestra in a program featuring the music of Barber, Brahms, and Dvorak.  The concert was recorded live at Verizon Hall this past February. The broadcast can be heard on 90.1 FM in Philadelphia and streaming online at WRTI.org.