Black History Month

February 24, 2020. As WRTI continues to mark Black History Month, we feature an album that celebrates, through contemporary music, the writings of the 19th-century Philadelphia abolitionist William Still

February 10, 2020. Continuing our celebration of Black History Month, WRTI’s Classical Album of the Week is devoted to the neglected symphonies of Florence Price, who was the first African-American woman to have a large-scale symphonic work performed by a major orchestra.

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Listen to baritone Keith Spencer sing four powerful African-American spirituals, as we usher in Black History Month at WRTI. Debra Lew Harder is host.

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Langston Hughes, an enduring icon of the Harlem Renaissance, is best-known for his written work, which wedded his fierce dedication to social justice with his belief in the transformative power of the word. But he was a music lover, too, and some of the works he was most proud of were collaborations with composers and musicians.

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Pianist, composer and WRTI alum Kendrah Butler-Waters and pianist and composer Tonya Dorsey are presenting a Black History Month concert at St. Martin De Porres Church on February 16th.  On Wednesday, February 6th they joined host J. Michael Harrison, along with some of their collective, in the WRTI Performance Studio.

The African-American patriot Richard Allen founded the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1794, and led the congregation of Bethel AME in Philadelphia in a former blacksmith shop on 6th Street near Lombard. A Craft Works ensemble visits WRTI's Performance Studio on Feb. 8 at 12:10 PM to sing music from Bishop Allen's hymnal. WRTI's Susan Lewis is host.

Jazz Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement

Feb 10, 2018

Join WRTI 90.1 as we recognize Black History Month by celebrating jazz artists and songs that were synonymous with the Civil Rights Movement. During regular jazz hours, we'll bring you this music and discuss its political connections.

Black History Month would not be complete without acknowledging R. Nathaniel Dett, one of the most successful black composers. An authoritative new recording of his complete piano works by Clipper Erickson shines a welcome light on a major portion of Dett’s output.

As the economic downturn continues to bite, we speak with the City of Philadelphia's Chief Cultural Officer, Gary Steuer. Public forums are being held to get community input on the city's approach to arts and culture.

David Patrick Stearns reports on the final week of The Philadelphia Orchestra's tour of Europe and the Canary Islands.

We mark Black History Month by revisiting Susan Lewis' look at In Search of Missing Masters, a show of African-American Art at the Woodmere Art Museum in the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia.